Issue: Medicaid

Medicaid Work Requirements Won’t Work and Are Likely Illegal

Work requirements appear to be a more subtle attempt to reduce the number of non-disabled adults added to Medicaid under the Affordable Care Act, which survived multiple attempts last year by Congress to repeal and replace it. But a work requirement for Medicaid isn’t necessary and won’t work. Not when nearly 80 percent of adults on Medicaid already live in working families and about 60 percent work themselves.

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For Some States, Kids’ Insurance Fund Runs Out Next Week

Some states are facing a mid-January loss of funding for their Children’s Health Insurance Program (CHIP) despite spending approved by Congress in late December that was expected to keep the program running for three months, federal health officials said late last week. The $2.85 billion was supposed to fund states’ CHIP programs through March 31. But some states will start running out of money after January 19.

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Left on Hold for the Holidays, CHIP Families and States Still Waiting

With bipartisan agreement on a strong, five-year funding extension and promises throughout the year that a CHIP extension would get done before January, states and families were counting on Congress to do its job. But Congress again punted action on CHIP with a short-term funding patch. This is an unprecedented abdication of responsibility for this important and successful program and creates a shameful burden for vulnerable families who spent the holidays worrying about health care for their children.

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Axing Individual Mandate Means Millions Lose Coverage

The Senate’s tax reform new bill would eliminate the Affordable Care Act’s (ACA’s) “individual mandate,” which requires all Americans to get health coverage if they can afford it. Independent health-care analysts and the Congressional Budget Office (CBO) agree that this move would deeply undercut the ACA and the progress it has made to reduce the number of uninsured. The CBO has estimated that ending the mandate would lead to 13 million more Americans lacking health care coverage.

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CHIP Delay is Risking Children’s Health and Costing States

Congress’ failure to renew Children’s Health Insurance Program (CHIP) funding leaves children at risk for loss of or gaps in coverage. But even the delay is costing states that have already begun preparing for the complex, costly process of rolling back their CHIP programs. A long-term and speedy extension of CHIP is critical to preserve and protect the nation’s historic achievement in covering more than 95 percent of our children.

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Patients, Health Insurers Challenge Iowa’s Privatized Medicaid

Iowa moved about 600,000 people on Medicaid into care that is managed by for-profit insurance companies. The idea is that the private companies would save the state money, but it has been a rocky transition, especially for people like Neal Siegel. Siegel is one of six disabled Iowans suing the state, alleging that Medicaid managed care, as it is known, deprives thousands of Iowans with disabilities the right to live safely in their homes.

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Those Who Guide Consumers through ACA Hitting Roadblocks

Open enrollment under the Affordable Care Act (ACA) is less than a month away. But the current landscape is marked by funding cuts and other White House efforts to pull back on Affordable Care Act outreach, which has led some people to brace for what they foresee as the toughest season yet. And the latest wrinkle? In states like Iowa that use the federal marketplace, healthcare.gov, many navigators — nonprofit groups and workers who receive federal funding to help consumers enroll — are hitting snags completing a mandatory certification course.

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Groups Unite to Oppose Destructive Health Care Bill

Saying that “health care is too important to get wrong,” groups representing hospitals, physicians and health insurance plans all warned that the bill’s cuts to Medicaid would cause millions of Americans to lose their coverage and the changes would weaken individual insurance markets, making coverage more costly. They also warned that patients and consumers will lose important protections and those with significant illnesses will be charged higher premiums and may not be able to buy coverage.

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