Issue: CHIP

Suddenly, Progress on Children’s Health Coverage Reverses

For many years, the rate of uninsured children in the United States has been declining thanks to bipartisan efforts to extend coverage through Medicaid and the Children’s Health Insurance Program. But in 2017, approximately 276,000 more children became uninsured, leading to a total of 3.9 million uninsured children nationwide. The rate for children age 18 and younger went up from 4.7 percent in 2016 to 5 percent in 2017,

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For Some States, Kids’ Insurance Fund Runs Out Next Week

Some states are facing a mid-January loss of funding for their Children’s Health Insurance Program (CHIP) despite spending approved by Congress in late December that was expected to keep the program running for three months, federal health officials said late last week. The $2.85 billion was supposed to fund states’ CHIP programs through March 31. But some states will start running out of money after January 19.

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Left on Hold for the Holidays, CHIP Families and States Still Waiting

With bipartisan agreement on a strong, five-year funding extension and promises throughout the year that a CHIP extension would get done before January, states and families were counting on Congress to do its job. But Congress again punted action on CHIP with a short-term funding patch. This is an unprecedented abdication of responsibility for this important and successful program and creates a shameful burden for vulnerable families who spent the holidays worrying about health care for their children.

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CHIP Delay is Risking Children’s Health and Costing States

Congress’ failure to renew Children’s Health Insurance Program (CHIP) funding leaves children at risk for loss of or gaps in coverage. But even the delay is costing states that have already begun preparing for the complex, costly process of rolling back their CHIP programs. A long-term and speedy extension of CHIP is critical to preserve and protect the nation’s historic achievement in covering more than 95 percent of our children.

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