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More Adolescents Seek Medical Care For Mental Health Issues

The spike in youth mental health visits corresponds with a recent survey that found that members of “Generation Z” — defined in the survey as people born since 1997 — are more likely than other generations to report their mental health as fair or poor. The 2018 polling, done on behalf of the American Psychological Association, also found that members of Generation Z, along with millennials, are more likely to report receiving treatment for mental health issues.

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Ringgold County Hospital ER Director Names 2019 Hospital Hero

The symphony at Ringgold County Hospital may not be as easy on the ears as a group of talented musicians, but what it does have is orchestrated beauty of health care delivery in the emergency department. This department is lead by emergency medical director and Iowa Hospital Hero, Dr. Angela Kerchner. Harmony is what Dr. Kerchner portrays in her work and everyday life. She also brings her therapy dog, Winkey, to visit with patients and relieve anxiety associated with illness.

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States Try A Gentler Approach To Getting Medicaid Enrollees To Work

The Trump administration has approved Medicaid work requirements in nine states, with requests from nine others pending. Arkansas is the only state to implement the requirements, and more than 18,000 enrollees there lost coverage from June 2018 to March 2019 — with little sign many found jobs. Since then, a federal judge struck down the work requirements in Arkansas, Kentucky and New Hampshire. A handful of states are offering alternatives to get more enrollees into jobs to lift them out of poverty and off Medicaid.

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As Vaping Devices Evolve, New Potential Hazards Scrutinized

The smokeless tobacco industry that began with low-voltage cigarette look-alikes has evolved to include customizable, high-wattage machines capable of generating enormous clouds of vapor ― and potentially toxic substances. As the technology continues to change, researchers are finding more evidence that the way vaping devices and e-liquids interact could harm consumers. High-powered devices may overheat vaping liquids to produce toxic chemicals, tobacco experts warn, and the aerosol that is inhaled may be contaminated with dangerous metals from the device.

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Taking Cops out of Mental Health-Related 911 Rescues

Nationally, police officers carry the brunt of responding to mental health issues. In 2017, law enforcement agencies spent $918 million transporting people with severe mental illness, according to a 2019 survey from the Treatment Advocacy Center. It also estimated that officers spend 21% of their time responding to and transferring people for mental health issues.

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Why Hospitals Are Getting Into The Housing Business

Legally and morally, hospitals cannot discharge patients if they have no safe place to go. So patients who are homeless, frail or live alone, or have unstable housing, can occupy hospital beds for weeks or months — long after their acute medical problem is resolved. For hospitals, it means losing money because a patient lingering in a bed without medical problems doesn’t generate much, if any, income.

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The Deep Divide: State Borders Create Medicaid Haves And Have-Nots

State borders have become arbitrary dividing lines between Medicaid’s haves and have-nots, with Americans in similar financial straits facing vastly different health care fortunes. This affects everything from whether diseases are caught early to whether people can stay well enough to work. It wasn’t supposed to be this way. The ACA, passed in 2010, called for extending Medicaid to all Americans earning up to 138% of the federal poverty level, around $17,000 annually for an individual. But the U.S. Supreme Court in 2012 let states choose whether to expand Medicaid.

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Want To Reduce Suicides? Follow The Data

Officials in Washington County, Oregon believe they’ve chipped away at this problem through an initiative to use data. For example, data revealed a surprising number of suicides at hotels and motels. It also showed a number of those who killed themselves had experienced eviction or foreclosure or had a medical visit within weeks or days of their death. It revealed that people in crisis regularly turn their pets over to the animal shelter. Experts began offering training to motel clerks and housekeepers, animal shelter workers, pain clinic staffers and more and the suicide rate in the county has decreased.

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Despite Booming Economy, Uninsured Rate Ticks Up

The annual report from the Census Bureau, released last week, found that 27.5 million Americans were without health insurance last year, an increase of nearly 2 million from 2017. The 0.5 percentage point increase in the uninsured rate — to 8.5% — was the first in a decade and came as unemployment and other economic indicators have been good.

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