Senate Panel Makes Surprisingly Fast Work Of ‘Surprise Medical Bills’ Package

It may seem as if the Senate, or at least certain key senators, have decided on a way forward to fix the nation’s “surprise medical bill” problem. But make no mistake: The door is still open to try another solution.

Members of the Health, Education, Labor and Pensions (HELP) Committee approved a sweeping measure Wednesday that tackles a range of big-ticket health care concerns. The 196-page bill touches nearly every aspect of the health care industry, from lowering the price of prescription drugs and creating a national database of health care costs, to increasing vaccine rates and preventing youth tobacco use.

One thing the bill specifically does not deal with: the insurance market and the Affordable Care Act, which could be why the massive package was voted out of the committee in just over two hours with little debate. The Lower Health Care Costs Act of 2019, sponsored by HELP Committee Chairman Lamar Alexander (R-Tenn.) and Patty Murray (D-Wash.), the top Democrat on the panel, sailed through with a bipartisan 20-3 vote.

Still, just because the first hurdle has been cleared doesn’t mean there’s room for speculation about what could happen between now and when it reaches the Senate floor. Alexander said he’s hoping the bill will be voted on before the Senate leaves Aug. 2 for a monthlong recess.

One of three proposed approaches — benchmarking — ultimately made it into the formal draft. Here’s how it works: When patients are seen by doctors who aren’t in their network, the insurer would pay the providers the “median in-network rate,” meaning the rate would be similar to what the plan pays other doctors in the area for the same procedure.

At the markup hearing Wednesday, Alexander said he initially preferred one of the other approaches, the in-network guarantee, but changed his mind when the Congressional Budget Office said benchmarking would save more money.